Tag Archive: television


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Fuller House Season 2 released on Netflix earlier this month. I, being a fan of both Full House and Season 1 of Fuller House, watched the show in my free time. On the surface, Season 2 seems to be more progressive than season one, with more LGBTQ+ representation as well as more challenging of gender norms. However, I couldn’t help but feel like I had been tricked and cheated by the writers of Fuller House into believing they were progressive (especially since they literally have the cast members proclaim that they are anti-Trump and that they are for a large variety of progressive ideals).

When thinking critically about the show, however, it seems that, sure, there are many progressive ideas, from sustainable backyard organic farming to female empowerment, and the show likes to challenge gender norms and expectations, but that certain things are only there as a joke. That is mostly the LGBTQ+ themed parts.

Take, for instance, the very first scene of Season 2. Season 1 ended with protagonist DJ deciding to take time to figure herself out before she decides whether she wants to date her high school sweetheart, Steve, or her new, hunky (better option, imo) work partner Matt. Season two begins and she has finally decided who she wants to date. DJ has not seen Steve or Matt all summer (even though Matt is her work partner? I’m not sure how that worked out. They’re veterinarians, not teachers), so this is her first time catching up with them. Apparently, Matt and Steve bonded over the summer and became best friends (for plot simplicity, probably). They come over together all buddy-buddy, making jokes about wanting meat. The scene was set up so that it actually seemed like they were a little too close to be just friends. The expectation that Matt and Steve were going to come out and say they were dating each other escalated as they stood next to each other, arms wrapped around each other, and proclaimed “We’ve actually found someone.”

Only for the punch line to be delivered by Stephanie: “Each other? I always had a feeling!”

And it’s played off as a big laugh, because obviously they weren’t dating each other. They each actually had found girlfriends, and their girlfriends were coming over to meet the Fullers/Tanners/Gibblers. This would not be a huge deal if this was how Matt and Steve’s friendship was – very close, a lot of touching, etc. However, this is one of the only times Matt and Steve are portrayed this way, and it is all a set up for a gay joke. I know I was a little disappointed to see that they built that up just to make a joke about it.

But Matt and Steve are not the only examples of this. We have an almost opposite joke in one of the following episodes. DJ and Stephanie decide to crash a wedding. While there, DJ meets Sean, a charming and attractive man around her age. She and Sean get along very well, and DJ is very interested in seeing him again. He even asks her for her phone number! It’s at this point that he informs Stephanie that he’s gay – and he suddenly starts behaving differently. He starts dancing flamboyantly, talking about the cute waiter – things that he hadn’t done in the last 10 minutes (of screen time) we were interacting with him. It’s played off as a big joke. Haha, the guy DJ was into was actually a gay guy all along. How could she not tell?! Let’s also remember that they live in the heart of San Francisco, literally the gayest place in America, and Sean is the only LGBTQ+ person they ever interact with.

But this post wouldn’t be complete without going into more detail about the apparent challenging of gender norms. We see this with both Steve and Matt’s friendship as well as the relationship between the older generation of brothers, Danny, Jesse, and Joey. I’ve already mentioned how Matt and Steve’s friendship is built up just to make a gay joke, but there is also a scene later that I am quite frustrated with. After Steve gets DJ a birthday gift and gives Matt the credit, they have a really tender broment (bro moment). Matt asks “Should we hug?” and Steve and he hug. After a few seconds, Matt asks “Should we stop?” Steve responds, “It’s your hug, your decision.” So instead of stopping, Matt slowly and awkwardly puts his hand on the back of Steve’s head and pats it tenderly. The scene then ends.

What I described above sounds like it’s awesome. Two male best friends who are not afraid to hug each other and be intimate. How great is that?! It would be great, if there wasn’t a laugh track over it.

The problem is that Fuller House is a show intended for children. Although there are adult moments overlaid there to appease the generation who grew up watching Full House, it is primarily a children’s show. That’s why making these jokes is bad. The reason it’s funny that Matt and Steve are hugging like that is because “Boys don’t hug like that!” Brothers hug like that. Kids hug like that. Adult men don’t hug that like. How silly.

The same goes for the thanksgiving episode, where Danny, Jesse, Becky, Joey and their children come. Jesse and Danny end up sharing a bed. The next day they are talking about it, saying one was trying to snuggle the other, but then they reveal that they were actually quite comfortable snuggling each other. This, again, is played off as a joke, because adult men don’t cuddle in bed together.

The problem I’m having with this season of Fuller House is that they are turning intimate, close male friendships into jokes. They are telling the children the show is directed at that these are things that are weird and out of place, and they should think it’s silly. It shows that despite their progressive assertions, there is a bit of internalized homophobia going on here. It’s based in stereotypes and gender policing. It should be better than it is. You can have fun, interesting LGBTQ+ characters, or non-stereotypical men (like Jimmy Gibbler!), without making gay jokes.

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Things That Annoyed me About Daredevil

 

So I, like many people, binge watched Daredevil season 2 this weekend. It was entertaining, but it was certainly not as good as the first season, or as good as Jessica Jones. There were a lot of loose ends and forgotten subplots. Some of these issues may be due to me missing something or forgetting things from the first season (which I didn’t rewatch in anticipation). Also, there are HELLA spoilers here, so if you haven’t watched it and don’t want to be spoiled, don’t read! The first few are pretty spoiler light, but it gets more intense. Let me know if there are any explanations or if you agree or disagree!

 

  1. How long has passed?

It isn’t clear how much time has passed from the end of season 1 to the beginning of season 2. It’s also unclear how much time has passed over the course of the season. I know that the court case was only a week after Castle was caught, but how long did the case go for? How long before castle got put in jail? How long before he escaped? Claire says that she was assigned 6 months of night shift after helping Luke Cage and Jessica Jones, so we know it’s been at least 6 months since then, but Jessica Jones isn’t very clear about how long after Daredevil season 1 it was, we just know Daredevil exists. It’s very unclear, and I would like an explanation.

 

  1. Where does this fit in to the MCU?

What has or has not happened so far in the MCU? Did the Civil War happen already? Is it building up to that? Where does Spiderman fit in to this world? He’s another NYC hero, and evidently he’s going to be important in Civil War, so where’s he been? They keep talking about vigilantes but don’t mention the web slinger? Perhaps its rights, but it still annoys me.

 

  1. I really don’t understand the dirt, or the hole.

I realize that it’s very possible that these things were left ambiguous intentionally. But at the very least I want an explanation of the dirt. If they are digging supermassive holes in the city, why are they importing one box car of dirt, and why is that dirt so super secret? I would be completely ok with this being an unresolved issue for the future, but literally once DD and Elektra discover the dirt, they never mention it again. I’m also annoyed that DD could sense the dirt in the boxcar, but couldn’t tell that it was dirt? He’s all like “It’s completely full, filled with uniform items packed tight” but he can’t tell that they’re freaking dirt? That just seems unlikely.

 

  1. Why did the Hand mask their heartbeats?

This could be me forgetting things from season 1, but I’m not quite sure why the Hand would mask their heartbeats. Unless this is a specific countermeasure to Daredevil, this seems like a huge waste of energy and resources. I don’t recall if Nobu knew that Daredevil was blind, but that’s the only reason I would think to do that. Clearly, the understanding was that the Hand knew DD was blind, but I don’t really remember how they knew that. I also think that if they knew he was blind and he tracked sounds, that they’d be smart enough to not use weapons that were so loud. Also, I’m confused as to how the Hand actually masked their heartbeats. They repeatedly say it, so we as an audience just accept it, but how do they do that?

 

  1. What happened to the Hand ninjas who were chasing them from down the stairs?

In the season finale, Elektra and DD are getting chased by a shit-ton of hand members. “Too many to count” in fact. They are in a stairwell and they know that there are a bunch of guys on the roof and a bunch more chasing after them from down below. But when they go onto the roof, there are about 20 hands guys plus Nobu, and the ones from downstairs never arrive. What happened to them?

 

  1. Why bother having the Punisher show up at the end?

It was obvious that Frank was going to come and help them. The whole time I was wondering at what point he would show up to save them, because the last thing we saw him do was turn on his police radio. It was obvious. However, when he finally did show up, he was pretty useless. DD and Elekrtra had just fought the aforementioned 20ish ninjas plus Nobu, and though Elektra died, there were only 4 ninjas left by the time Frank showed up. If DD and Elektra could take on 20 plus Nobu, DD could easily have taken on 4 plus Nobu. It seems that Frank only showed up to remind the audience that he is, indeed a “good guy” in terms of everything.

 

  1. Why did Daredevil stop caring about killing people?

For the entire Punisher situation, DD was adamant about him not killing people. He knocked guns out of his hand and stopped him when he was trying to kill people with his bare hands. When Elektra came on board, he was adamant about her not being allowed to kill anyone. When the Hand attacks them at the pit, she almost dies because he doesn’t want her to kill anyone. Then she leaves after killing the ninja in DD’s house. However, immediately after this, he makes no more mention of killing the Hand. While he and Elektra are fighting them she repeatedly stabs and kills them and he doesn’t even acknowledge it. Then at the end Frank shoots the Hand guys and he just kind of rolls with it. He even throws Nobu off of the building. I know he has some understanding that Nobu has some sort of resilience, but you don’t throw someone off a roof by their neck without expecting them to die. This would all make sense if it was premised with something, but there’s no explanation.

 

  1. What was Elektra’s mission, exactly?

Matt asks Elektra if their meeting was chance, or a mission, and she tells him he was her mission. But what exactly was the point of the mission? Intuitively, it seems she intended to teach him to kill, but that’s never really explicitly stated. And then once he refuses to kill Sweeney she just gives up? He constantly asks her where she goes, and she never answers. We can assume she returns to Stick to tell him about her failure, but we don’t know. It’s not clear, and once she talks about him being a mission, that’s all we see. There’s no further discussion on the topic.

 

  1. Why does Karen never get her conflict resolved?

It is clear to me why Karen identifies with the Punisher so much. It’s because she killed the guy who kidnapped her in season 1, and she want sot feel justified. This is alluded to heavily in the beginning of the season. She feels guilty, and like a bad person for doing so. She thinks that if they can prove the Punisher’s killings were justified, that they also prove that her killing was justified. However, this subplot quickly vanishes into obscurity, never getting fulfilled.

 

  1. Who were the suits that Castle’s nurse mentions?

The nurse mentions that some men in suits came by Castle’s room and he didn’t know who they were. He also said the District Attorney ordered the DNR. Now, it’s possible these “suits” were just the DA’s people, however, when Karen sets off the motion detector in Castle’s house, men in suits arrive. This leads me to believe the suits are more than just the DA’s people. It’s not very clear. It could easily be the DA’s people, but I’d like a little finality to that assertion.

 

  1. Why was nobody watching the Punisher’s house?

So Frank gets arrested, sent to jail, and then escapes. And the first thing he does is return to his house. I’m pretty sure that if a person convicted of 30 murders breaks out of prison, they would have someone watching his house. It’s not like nobody knew about his house. Karen was able to find it pretty easily, and the DA had vast files on Castle. Someone would have known his house was there and checked it out as a possible place he would go. But he just goes back there and settles in nicely, with no issue. We don’t even get a visit from the men in suits that came when Karen set off the motion detector. Why is that? What is the deal with that house?

 

  1. What exactly do the Hand want with Elektra?

We know that Elektra is the Black Sky, this super obscure super weapon that the Hand wants to use to rule the world. However, we never see anything in Elektra that would suggests she is that powerful. It is clear at the end that they didn’t need her alive, and I can only assume that she will be resurrected by the hand to be the Black Sky. However, this leaves me a bit confused. It was clear that in her current iteration she had no special abilities other than combat prowess. Did the Hand need her to die in order to use her as the Black Sky? If so, why did they not kill her when they had her surrounded? Why did they instead bow to her? Perhaps she would be more powerful if she joined them while living, rather than being resurrected, but it’s unclear. We don’t even know what the Black Sky is meant to do. We can assume that whatever they were doing to those people was meant to possibly bring out the Black Sky powers in Elektra by putting her in that pod, but we don’t know. This is certainly something that will probably be clarified in the next season, since it’s so wide open and intentionally unclear.

 

  1. Why did the Blacksmith target Karen, but not Foggy and Matt?

We know that after Punisher escapes, the Blacksmith starts killing people involved in the case. The DA goes down first, and Foggy gets hit, but he clearly wasn’t a target. Then next we see Karen’s apartment get shot up and Punisher saves her. But it’s really not clear why the Blacksmith would target Karen before Matt and Foggy. Perhaps it was due to ease, since Matt was hard to find and Foggy was in the hospital, but it seems pretty odd to me. Karen was a legal assistant and there was no real way for the Blacksmith to know she was important until she showed up to his house.

 

  1. Why would the Punisher slam a pickup truck into a sedan with someone he believed to be innocent in it?

When the Blacksmith takes Karen, The Punisher saves her by ramming the car they are in. This has got to be the biggest mistake of the whole series. They were pulling over. They were getting out of the car, most likely to go into that shed where the Blacksmith kept his stuff. There was no reason that the Punisher should have slammed into the car, risking Karen’s life. It is just counter to his characterization at this point.

 

  1. Why do we never see or hear about Matt working out?

There is only one reference to exercise in the whole show, and that is when Elektra says something about Matt having been working out. But has he been? Sure, he is a vigilante who prowls the streets at night, climbing things and such, but that won’t make him stronger. I suppose you can say that he gets all his exercise from his vigilantism but fighting and climbing things won’t necessarily make someone stronger, just more toned. Not that he’s supposed to be super strong, but it would be more realistic to me if they mentioned him exercising, maybe showed him doing some sit ups or push ups or something. It’s a small thing, but I think would add to his character. At least even a mention of someone asking him how he stays so fit or something.

 

  1. Does injury mean nothing to anyone in this universe?

A lot of people get hurt in this season. First we have Frank, a.k.a. the Punisher. When the Irish mob leader “captures” Frank, he drills a hole in his left foot. With a drill. And electric drill. But the next week he’s walking totally fine. He still has the bruises on his face, but his foot is totally fine. Next we have Elektra, who gets sliced with an acidic blade. Luckily, stick shows up to put together a remedy of common household items that… rapidly heals her? Then Matt gets shot in the shoulder with an arrow and Elektra gives him that same magical remedy. And the next day they are fighting the Hand army. And Foggy also gets shot in the shoulder, but evidently his bullet wound was not that bad and he was only in the hospital overnight. Let’s also not forget that Karen was in a vicious car crash and then the next day seemed totally fine. Injury and trauma seem to have no long term effects on these characters.

 

  1. How does Punisher find out who the Blacksmith is?

Karen goes to the Blacksmiths house and has no idea he is the Blacksmith, but quickly discover it when he… tells her, I guess. He kidnaps her and tries to take her to his cabin thing for some reason, but then Frank shows up. How did he know to do that? I could have completely missed it, but I just don’t remember.

 

  1. Why did Stick kill the Black Sky in season 1, but not Elektra?

In season 1, another Black sky arrives to New York in the form of a young boy. Stick kills this Black Sky and Matt sends him away. In season 2, we discover that Elektra was a Black Sky, and that Stick decided against killing her when she was a child, instead sending her to live with the Nacios family. I’m wondering what prompted Stick to kill the new black sky but not Elektra? This isn’t really a huge issue, as I can see a few different options. Firstly, he was much closer with Elektra by the time he was asked to kill her. However, they knew the whole time she was the Black Sky, so I’m not sure why he bothered doing that at all. Also, Stick didn’t like when people called Elektra it, yet he called the new Black Sky it. Since there was about 15-20 years since Stick and Elektra parted ways, he could have changed much since then, but he is still protective of her. Stick’s characterization is all over the place

 

  1. What information did the Hand want from Stick?

When the Hand it torturing Stick with sticks, they want information. What did they need to know? What were they asking him? Were they looking for Elektra? It’s not really clear.

 

  1. Why didn’t Fisk just kill Matt?

Matt goes to the prison to threaten Fisk, and Fisk grabs him and roughs him up a little bit. I don’t get why Fisk didn’t just kill him. Fisk has the whole entire prison under his control, and it’s not really in his character to let someone who threatens Vanessa live. It would be very easy for all record of Matt’s visit to disappear and Matt to disappear with it. Now, Matt would be able to fight his way out of the prison, most likely, and survive, but Fisk doesn’t know that. All Fisk knows is that this blind lawyer is trying to threaten the woman he loves.

 

  1. Why would Hogarth want to make Foggy a partner?

I know that Foggy is a great lawyer, and I know that Hogarth’s firm is very high profile. I also know that Foggy doesn’t have all that much legal experience. I could understand Hogarth offering Foggy a good position, due to the high profile nature of both his major cases, but Partner?

The-Night-of-the-Living-Dead

Everyone knows that Night of the Living Dead is an iconic piece of cinema that paralleled the Red Scare and fears of communism slowly surrounding and consuming us. You see, when zombies first arrived, they had meaning. They were a symbol of something truly horrifying. They were a symbol of a threat against the democratic way of life. Let’s explore, briefly, what I mean.

Zombies, or undead – or whatever you decide to call them – began as slow moving and weak reanimations of those we once knew. It was easy to see them coming. It was easy to avoid them. They were very weak, and in order to break through those windows and doors had to repeatedly bang on them, weakening them until they could break through. If you encountered one, it was easy to avoid it, but if you encountered a hundred, it was much more difficult. This mirrored how people felt about communism.

Communism spread through communists. It spread slowly. You could easily identify a communist. Their words were not very strong, but repeatedly hearing them eventually wore down people’s own ideas about the importance of democracy. Communists were not random strangers from other countries, either. No, they were people you knew. They were people like sweet old Mrs. Adelman who feeds the neighborhood cats. They were people like Bill at the auto store. They weren’t exactly the same as before, but you knew them. They were familiar. You had a bond with them in some way. If there was one communist, you could avoid them. One hundred were not so easy to avoid.

I bring this up because zombies once had substance. Zombies once represented a real societal fear in our culture. I implore you to review all the books, movies, and games you have recently played, watched or read which involve zombies. Think of what those zombies represented in those stories. Mostly, the zombies are some overt representation of the Man vs. Nature conflict. They attempt to add a psychological depth to a story where there may be one. After all, how can you logically make a young boy shoot his mother, or a father shoot his only son? How can you stir up those emotions that accompany the struggle of watching a family member succumb to zombieism without zombies? Well, this is my point. It’s always possible to do those things. What zombies do is make it easy to do that.

My point is this: Zombies are LAZY.

Let’s look at some modern examples. The Walking Dead is one of the most popular shows on television right now. Based off of a highly acclaimed comic book serial, the show is loved by all, particularly apocalypse planners and zombie enthusiasts. It depicts a post-apocalyptic world where rival human factions struggle to survive in a world full of “Walkers” – the undead remnants of the past society that make nature suddenly more dangerous. Forget actual nature which, if given the chance to reclaim itself, would be drastically more dangerous. No, humans without minds are the greatest natural threat in the world. That is the message zombies are meant to portray. That is not the message they are often used to portray.

walking dead

In the show (and comic), the zombies serve very specific purposes. They are a constant environmental threat and conflict, of course, but in terms of plot, they serve a few specific functions. One of those functions is to serve as motivation for the characters to keep moving from place to place. If they stay in one place too long, the walkers find them. Another is to prevent them from doing something, or from following a direct path. (The quickest way into the city is through this tunnel? Well, Walkers hang out in tunnels, we can’t go in there. Let’s go all the way around.) And the final purpose they serve is to kill people off. Zombies kill people. That’s kind of their thing.

So why do I care? Well, as I said, zombies are lazy. Zombies also make plot boring. Let’s review the first plot purpose I mentioned: forcing characters to move. Simply saying “there are zombies and they need to avoid them” is simple. There are countless other reasons people could be nomadic. Perhaps there is a nomadic human faction that threatens them? Perhaps they are searching for something specific? Perhaps the rain is poisonous and they need to move away from storm clouds? There are a million possibilities and then a million more.

The issue with all off these options is that each one needs its own explanation. Each one needs a background, each one needs a dynamic story arc of its own. If they are being pursued by an enemy factions, who is leading this faction, why are they pursuing them? Are they going to kill them, torture them, capture them? Why? Is that faction all evil, or does it just have an evil leader(s)?

If they are seeking something then what are they seeking? Why are they seeking it? Where did it come from? Who found out about it? How does each member of the group feel about it? Is anyone else seeking it?

If the rain is poisonous, then what poisoned it? What are the effects of the poison rain? How does it affect the wildlife? What was done to try to fix it? What can save them from the rain’s poison? How do they get clean drinking water?

Now, with zombies, you can have the same questions. Where did the zombies come from? How can they be stopped? What are their main threats? However, you ask these questions once. They apply to every situation. You can’t go through a tunnel because of the zombies? Well, you already know all about the zombies. You can’t stay in one place too long because of the zombies? Doesn’t bring up any new questions. You can’t go through a tunnel because the poisonous rainwater is pooling inside? Or perhaps the poison rainwater has caused poisoned plants/animals to grow in the tunnel. This brings up new questions about why the water is pooling, why the animals are becoming poisonous, etc.

Using zombies is a lazy trick. It makes you complacent to not think of any new or interesting plot points for your story. Let’s look at the popular video game The Last of Us. This game follows a man and a young girl who many believe is the cure for zombieism. The zombies in the game pose a constant environmental hazard, but don’t really add much to the plot. They help drive the plot, because the whole idea is to try to stop the zombie disease, but they themselves aren’t pivotal to the plot. The disease could literally be anything, really.

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In the story you are introduced to three different kinds of zombies, each with different qualities. These zombies are spread out among the abandoned places of the world, and you must make your way through them to safety. However, the zombies don’t add to the plot. What adds to the plot are the gangs and cults you interact with. Sure, the zombies add a scare factor and intensity to the game that the humans may not, but they do not add to the story or the character development. The other human characters do that.

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If you are a young writer and you are thinking of having a zombie story, I urge you to think about why you want it to be a zombie story. Do you like zombies and don’t give a crap about any of this because zombies are cool? If so, go for it. Plenty of people like zombies because they’re zombies. However, if you want a more literary approach, consider replacing your zombies with some more complicated element. Take the time to think about what you want your characters to experience and craft a challenge that will lead them to that result. Don’t just use zombies as the default challenge for your entire book.

supergirl

It’s finally here. Supergirl has seen the silver screen, or at least a taste of it. She’s been picked up by CBS with a “series confirmation.” If this does not make your feminist heart swell up with extreme excitement, you need to think about this a little more. I’m going to go over all of the reasons why this is amazing:

She is Female.

Take a moment and think about all of the superhero movies you have seen in the recent fifteen years. Hell, think of any superhero movie or television show. Aside from the entirely abysmal Catwoman movie (which ended up being about makeup?), and the less than magnificent Elektra, the gender palettes have been entirely monochromatic, at least where protagonists are concerned. We have Superman, Batman, Iron Man, Thor, The Hulk, Captain America, Green Lantern, Spiderman, Fantastic 4, X-Men, Daredevil, Smallville, Arrow, Gotham, The Flash, Ant-Man, Guardians of the Galaxy, and the rest are all spearheaded by a male lead. He’s the most important one in the movie/show. There are women present, but they are not in charge. They are there, essentially, to serve the protagonists (as any secondary character is). This isn’t a problem, except that the women never take larger roles. Check out Anita Sarkeesian’s YouTube channel if you don’t understand what I mean. There are plenty of other blogs, vlogs, and documentaries about female tropes in media, like MissRepresentation. you can find a bunch of different ones. Women’s roles are never center stage. They are always there to support the male protagonist. Having a show where the Superhero is female, and therefore the one who is in charge, the one who is making decisions and being important, is good. Not to say that female characters in these other shows are useless. Chloe Sullivan and Lois Lane in Smallville are often the ones pushing the story forward, while Clark is trying to keep up. But it’s not their story. It’s his.

This will be entirely Kara’s story. If they were going to stick to the comics, she’d have a lot of interaction with her cousin, but the show can have that be distant. He can be like a mentor to her who gives her advice, because essentially he’s got his own stuff to do. The release referred to Superman as her “famous cousin,” which means he is established in this world. It would even be funny if people mistook her for superman sometimes, or asked for her instead of Superman sometimes. Or, if on occasion, he asked for her help, and she just zipped over and solved his problem faster than he could have and then goes home.

She’s not Superman.

Some people will roll their eyes because they think Supergirl is Female Superman. She isn’t. She has similar powers, but varied powers. The main difference is that Kara (Supergirl) grew up on Krypton. She experienced Kryptonian culture and technology. She experienced the destruction of her planet. She experienced the deaths of all the people she ever cared for. You think Batman’s back story is tragic? Get over it. All of her worst fears were realized. In many of the stories, she left Krypton wanting one thing: to find her cousin. And then she got to Earth and it took years to find him. Depending on the iteration you refer to, she has a few different origins. Most of them have her end up in some sort of cryogenic stasis until Cal-El is at least older than her, so when she awakens, she’s looking for her little cousin, and cannot find him, and some man claims that he is the little boy she’s looking for. Crazy stuff, right? What an emotional roller coaster! Another thing about her is that, since she grew up Kryptonian, she identifies as Kryptonian. Therefore, she has full access to all of her Kryptonian abilities. Superman, on the other hand, is limited because he does not Identify as Kryptonian. He identifies as Human. The more he accepts that he isn’t a human, the more powerful he becomes. Kara doesn’t have that issue. Kara doesn’t have any identity issues. Her issue is that she’s a proud Kryptonian and she is trying to find a way to show that.

The Superfamily is All About Culture

As I mentioned, Supergirl is trying to find a way to express Kryptonian heritage in a human world. This is such an important issue. Our country is highly focused on race and culture right now. Supergirl wants to show off everything she can do as a Kryptonian, but its difficult because that makes her not human. That separates her, and it makes her an outcast. Even when she uses her abilities for good, she’s still different. We need a show about someone trying to adjust to our culture. We need a show about culture shock, and how it affects you. We need a show about how amazing it is to learn about and accept another culture, even if you don’t identify with it. This is very important.

There are some things that could go wrong, but this has the potential to be amazing! We’ll have a female lead with most likely female co-leads. This will open the door for other female Superheroes. This could open the eyes of Hollywood and let them know that a well written female protagonist can sell. Please, take some time to support Supergirl if CBS finally airs it. She deserves it. Women deserve it.

supermangirl

So I had a random thought on my way to work the other day. I’ve been playing a Link Between Worlds and I love that they have Majora’s Mask sitting on the wall in Link’s House. It got me to thinking of everyone’s worst nightmare, Gannondorf wearing Majora’s Mask. Talk about terrifying. I ended up trying to concoct ways in which we could realistically see some representation of his idea, canon or not.

I thought of the “source” of Majora’s Mask, the Happy Mask Salesman.

majorasmasksalesman

In Ocarina of time, he is largely benign, but in Majora’s Mask he is creepy, manipulative, and downright diabolical (see above). It’s assumed that he is the only character in Termina who is the same as his Character in Hyrule. He traveled far. and ended up getting robbed by the imp in the forest. The forest which adults are supposed to be unable to travel though. This Mask Salesman is powerful and dangerous. We all know this. We also know that he manages to get Majora’s Mask but we do not know from where.

I thought of some scenarios where the Mask Salesman and Gannondorf meet. Gannondorf hires him to find the mask, but he gilts Ganondorf and bolts to Termina. There’s a bunch of possibilities. I thought that it would be cool to see it all as an hour long drama on TV. Then I began to think of how it would be set up. It would be weird with the time travel stuff.

But I remembered one show that constantly jumps between times. Once Upon a Time. My mind exploded with ideas! They can make a Legend of Zelda show in the style of Once Upon a Time. Each episode can be both with adult Link and young Link. Like in Once Upon a Time, whats happening in the past can be relevant to whats happening in the present. So, when adult Link is in the forest, Young Link is too. Of course, it will not follow the stories exactly. Certain aspects must be changed to make more sense. The Hookshot must be made magical, since its mechanically impossible with their technology. Link cant carry all those weapons around, so he’ll have to find them or plan ahead, or switch them before leaving home. But it will work.

So, we have the basic format set up. The story can start with Young Link walking into the Temple Of Time and taking the Master Sword, then Adult Link awakens as the Hero and young Link reverts back to the beginning, when Navi wakes him. Lets say, episode 1 is young Link acquiring the Kokiri Sword, and Adult Link learning to use the Master Sword. The season goes on. Young link cures the Deku tree, Adult Link clears the Forest temple. Young Link meets and develops a friendship with Epona and Malon. Malon helps Link sneak into the Castle to meet Zelda. Adult link Rescues Epona from the guy whose name I have forgotten. But we change the story a little. Link and Adult Malon unite to save the ranch, they bond, they romance. Link saves the whole ranch, not just Epona. Because heroism. I think most important is that Link+Malon are canon, not Link and Zelda.

Young Link goes to Death Mountain and is invited to a great feast by Darunia (as a messenger of the royal family). At the feast, link plays Saria’s Song on the ocarina. The Gorons love it. Link teaches them the song. They repay him with the strength bracelet. Dodongo’s attack the dinner and Link kills them while the Gorons freak out. In the future Link meets Darunia’s son, Link, who tells him about Volvagia the dragon and gives him the magic tunic.  Young Link enters the dodongo’s cavern while adult Link enters the Fire Temple. Lets have an episode where Adult Link needs to go back into the cavern for something he couldn’t get as a kid.

Link can’t carry giant bombs, so the bomb bag is small. Bombs are more like grenades, but bomb flowers are gigantic. Young Link kills the Dodongo king with a bomb flower. Adult Link and Darunia fight Volvagia together. Darunia has the hammer. The dragon disarms him, and link lifts up the mighty hammer and uses it to make the final blow.

Young Link goes to Zora’s Domain and spends the day playing – doing the diving competition, going to Lake Hylia, etc. He finds the bottle with Ruto’s note, and brings it to the King. He climbs into Jabu Jabu’s mouth and down his throat. Adult Link finds Zora’s Domain Frozen. He searches for signs of life and finds the king frozen in magical ice. He goes to check on Jabu Jabu, who is gone. However, he sees a cave that is now accessible due to the ice. He thinks that maybe some Zora’s are hiding there. Inside he finds blue fire and a Zora Tunic. Shiek appears to him and tells him that Ruto has headed to the Water Temple at Lake Hylia to fix everything. Link uses the blue fire to Revive the King and heads to Lake Hylia. Lake Hylia is drained and link uses the Zora tunic to enter the temple. Young Link rescues Ruto. Adult Link and Ruto work together to defeat Morpha. Dark Link appears from Link’s reflection in the defeated Morpha. Young Link must sneak back into the castle to find Zelda. He has the stones!

There are no guards at the castle. Link walks right in. Soldiers are down. Gannondorf is making his move on Zelda. Link runs into the throne room. Gannondorf Kills the King. Impa and the Queen fight Gannondorf. Zelda Arrives, and the queen orders Impa to take her and flee. The Queen faces Gannondorf alone. Link tries to save the Queen, but is easily tossed aside by Gannondorf. Gannondorf chases Zelda. Link chases Gannondorf. Using a secret passage shown to him earlier by Impa, Link sees Zelda outside the gate. She tosses the Ocarina into the water. Gannondorf arrives and offers Link amnesty if he tells him where Zelda went. Link refuses, and Gannondorf attempts to kill him, and rides off. Link lies badly beaten, the image zooms in on the water where the ocarina is. Link retrieves it and uses it to open the temple of Time. He takes the Master Sword and is propelled forward in time. Gannondorf enters the Sacred Realm. Season over.

Adult Link faces off against his Dark Visage. Season ends where we see Dark Link has traded places with Link. Link becomes trapped in the Water Temple while Dark Link leaves with Ruto (unbeknownst to Ruto).

Season starts with Sheik (who is played by a female, but is viewed as male by all the characters) meeting up with Dark Link (who he thinks is Link). Sheik noticed that Link is off, and asks what happened in the Water Temple. Dark Link plays the “battle hardens you” card. Sheik doesn’t buy it. He asks Malon to try to talk sense into Link, who has stopped trying to rescue sages and was off canoodling with Ruto. Malon confronts Dark Link and quickly realizes that something is not right. He does not recognize her. She mentions Epona and Link ignores the mention. Malon tells Sheik that something is wrong, so Sheik and Malon go to the water temple, which is now flooded with water except for at the reflecting pool, where Dark Link appeared. They find Link and rescue him. Dark Link has the Master Sword, so they set a trap for him. Link has had time to reflect on how he lost to Dark Link and manages to get the Master Sword back from him and defeat him.

Adult Link goes back in time to go under the well. Adult Link enters the Shadow Temple and rescues Impa. We start to see flashbacks of Zelda and Impa’s adventure. Adult Link goes back in time to the Spirit Temple.Link befriends Nabooru. Nabooru is taken by the witches. Link goes forward in time. We see Nabooru flashbacks of her time imprisoned by Twinrova. Link tries to rescue Nabooru as young Link after traveling back. Link and Nabooru defeat Twinrova. Link hears that Gannondorf has been searching for a weapon. Gannonorf has sent the Happy Mask Salesman to find this weapon. They have heard only whispers of Majora’s Mask.

I’l stop my ranting now. All I will say is that while this is going on, the Happy Mask Salesman is the “Rumpelstiltskin” of the story. He has his hand in everything, and his motives are never clear. His true motive is to recover Majora’s Mask, which makes a few appearances passively in the story up until this point. Gannondorf thinks the Salesman is getting the mask for him, but the salesman wants it for himself. The Salesman sometimes helps the rebels (Anti-Gannondorf) and sometimes helps Ganondorf. However, he always seems to have sinister intent.

I ask Nintendo to let me be a writer for this show when they see my concept. Americans will love it. It’s dark, edgy, and complex. It takes all our favorite parts of the Legend of Zelda and gives it to us in live action. Just don let Disney touch it or it will die by the end of the second season because they’ll charge too much for syndication (I’m looking at you, Legend of the Seeker.) Rant officially over.